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Nidhogg Tearer of Corpses by GENZOMAN Nidhogg Tearer of Corpses by GENZOMAN
Hi guys! this is an old image done some years ago. I hope you like it :)

PSCS/graphire 2/6hours/music: Treasury Room - Super Castlevania IV
www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4VF0m…
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LETS WIKIATTACK!

In Norse mythology, Níđhöggr (Malice Striker, often anglicized Nidhogg) is a dragon who gnaws at a root of the world tree, Yggdrasil. In historical Viking society, níđ was a term for a social stigma implying the loss of honor and the status of a villain. Thus, its name might refer to its role as a horrific monster or in its action of chewing the corpses of the inhabitants of Náströnd: those guilty of murder, adultery, and oath-breaking, which Norse society considered among the worst possible crimes.

According to the Gylfaginning part of Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda, Níđhöggr is a being which gnaws one of the three roots of Yggdrasill. It is sometimes believed that the roots are trapping the beast from the world. This root is placed over Niflheimr and Níđhöggr gnaws it from beneath. The same source also says that "The squirrel called Ratatöskr runs up and down the length of the Ash, bearing envious words between the eagle and Nídhöggr". In the Skáldskaparmál section of the Prose Edda Snorri specifies Níđhöggr as a serpent in a list of names of such creatures:      These are names for serpents: dragon, Fafnir, Iormungand, adder, Nidhogg, snake, viper, Goin, Moin, Grafvitnir, Grabak, Ofnir, Svafnir, masked one. Snorri's knowledge of Níđhöggr seems to come from two of the Eddic poems: Grímnismál and Völuspá.  Later in Skáldskaparmál, Snorri includes Níđhöggr in a list of various terms and names for swords.

The poem Grímnismál identifies a number of beings which live in Yggdrasill. The tree suffers great hardship from all the creatures which live on it. The poem identifies Níđhöggr as tearing at the tree from beneath and also mentions Ratatoskr as carrying messages between Níđhöggr and the eagle who lives at the top of the tree. Snorri Sturluson often quotes Grímnismál and clearly used it as his source for this information.  The poem Völuspá mentions Níđhöggr twice. The first instance is in its description of Náströnd.

"A hall I saw,far from the sun,On Nastrond it stands,and the doors face north,Venom dropsthrough the smoke-vent down,For around the wallsdo serpents wind. I there saw wadingthrough rivers wildtreacherous menand murderers too,And workers of illwith the wives of men;There Nithhogg suckedthe blood of the slain,And the wolf tore men;would you know yet more?"

 The most prevalent opinion is that the arrival of Níđhöggr heralds Ragnarök and thus that the poem ends on a tone of ominous warning.

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:iconjaguare19:
jaguare19 Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Muy bueno,
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:iconnragaglia:
nragaglia Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
WTF HOW COOOOOOOOOOOL MANNN!!!!
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:iconironicktv:
IronickTV Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Fav!
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:iconwinter-twilight:
Winter-Twilight Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2014
Absolutely Awesome. I love the colors and depicted lighting. The eyes are especially impressive.
Reply
:iconscorpionjb:
scorpionjb Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2014
amazning
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:iconkewlupetrew:
kewlupetrew Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2014
Jamas pude obtener esa carta :(
Reply
:iconjulian0123:
julian0123 Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Great picture.
In some versions, I think it's a dragon.
Reply
:icondragonschild666:
DragonsChild666 Featured By Owner Jun 27, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
well the Norse often fused the concepts of snakes and dragons so ur not far off.
Also in, I think it said it was in Völuspá, at the end of the seer predictions of Ragnarok it states the a dragon will rise from the beneath the earth with the bodies of the slain on its pinions. Seeing as Nidhogg is never mentioned dying in the battle and it feeds on the dead I personally think that the dragon mentioned may be Nidhogg having grown wings whilst feasting on those who died during Ragnarok.
Just a personal opinion of course but it does have enough links to make it plausible even if not certain.
Reply
:iconxonky-36-x:
Xonky-36-X Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2014
sssssssssss-subarashi X)
Reply
:iconart-eli:
Art-Eli Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
wow, beautiful one! i love the details :D
Reply
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